Social media and advanced SEO

 

If you have decided to implement advanced search engine optimization for your website, there’s a lot to be excited about. Whether you’ve hired an expert to handle it, or you did it all by yourself, it’s a good idea to visualize the near-future development of the site. Some short term goals will be achieved, while other goals of any kind might change or you will find yourself pushing for a longer time frame in which to achieve them. This is fine, and it usually happens as you fine-tune your website for a steady growth. The longer the time in which a website remains active, the more it contributes (to some degree) to the success of the optimization techniques implemented.

To put it in other words, there is simply nothing you can do about it, as we have not yet found ways in which to control the passage of time. All you can do is to take advantage of this, plan ahead as well as you can & adapt to the factors around you. If you correct mistakes (you’ll inevitably make some, the trick is to learn from them) and follow through with a level head, you’ll find it’s all just about the new rules to the game, so to speak. Some opportunities may rise that will give you a better growth curve. We’ll go over some things to look for when it comes to the social media aspect of SEO.

 

Social media networking is where a lot of the magic happens when it comes to on-site SEO. The first thing to think about is that this is a term that includes a lot of websites. Social trends come and go and it’s always a good idea to keep your digital ear to the ground. Of course, if you’ve hired someone to do it, this should definitely be something they’ve taken care of. But even in this case, it could help you to know a few pointers, because you won’t be investing in hired help forever (ideally).

The first thing to note here is the already mentioned changing of trends. Micromanaging even a bit can lead to great things. A good example of this would be something along the lines of finding a popular keyword or hashtag as you browse the social network and using it to the advantage of your own website. However, this is also something which could (easily) lead to a downfall instead of an improvement. What you want to do, instead of just jumping at the opportunity when you come across something like this, is to assess the entire picture. What other sites is this trending on? What is the context of the trend in question, and – most importantly – how can you use it correctly? Correctly, meaning here with regard to the context, while being integral and ethical. It would be most unwise, for example, to simply latch on to something and later find out that because you weren’t aware of the entire situation, your website will have gained an infamous reputation and you’ll be left wondering how could you have made such a mistake. So, remember, always know what you’re affiliating your website with – it is always better to stick to situations where the context is favourable to your own business, or is in some way related directly to the content of your website. To give yourself even a better chance, wait a bit and observe what direction the trend will take and then analyse again the possible ways in which you can use it correctly. Better yet, if you can find a way in which to directly relate the content of your website, it might help even more.

Two things to remember. First, opportunities may arise every now and then, but eventually social media will move on to something else. Secondly, remember to not use this tactic aggressively, it is only effective if used sparingly, and used right. The right opportunity is not hard to miss if you know how to relate directly, or indirectly, the content of your website to social media uproars.

SEO Tips

To optimize your whole site for search engines, you’ll need to follow these basic tips:

1. Make the website about one thing.

It can be about other stuff, too, but choose one primary topic that is most essential to your message.

This step is important, so you may want to do a little keyword research before choosing a topic.

2. Mention keywords where they matter most.

Include your “one thing” in the site title, domain name, description, tagline, keywords, blog categories, page titles, and page content.

If you’re on WordPress, you can change a lot of this in the General Settings or through a plugin like All in One SEO Pack .

3. Link to internal pages on your site.

A lot of content management systems automatically do this, but if yours doesn’t, you’ll want to be intentional about linking to your most important pages directly from your homepage and cross-linking them with each other.

4. Use a permalink structure that includes keywords.

Some sites have “ugly” permalink structures that use numbers to identify pages.

Don’t do this. It’s bad for SEO and just doesn’t look good.

Use a URL structure that includes text, and make sure you include keywords in your URLs.

So instead of having a page’s URL be this:

http://yoursite.com/?p=12

It should look more like this:

http://yoursite.com/coolpage/

5. Remove anything that slows down your website.

Page load times are important, so get rid of any non-essentials that bog down your website.

These may including music players, large images, flash graphics, and unnecessary plugins.

6. Use keywords in your images.

Include words that reflect your site topic in the image title, description, and alt attributes.

Also, re-title the file name if it doesn’t reflect your main keywords (e.g. writing-tips.jpg instead of d1234.jpg).

7. Link to other websites with relevant content.

You can do this by including a blogroll, link list, or resources page on your website.

Of course, do it sparingly, as each outbound link is a “vote” for another site. However, if you do it well and people click your links, this tells search engines you are a trusted authority on your particular topic.

8. Update your website frequently.

Sites with dynamic content often rank higher than those with static content. That’s why blogs and directories (like Wikipedia) do so well on search engines. They are constantly being updated with new content.

9. Make sure your website is indexed in search engines.

A lot of search engines will automatically find and index your content, but don’t count on it.

You want to be sure engines like Google, Bing, and Yahoo are crawling your site, so that people are finding you online. (You can add them directly, if they’re not.)

10. Have other websites link to you.

This is really, really important, when it comes to SEO. The bummer is that it’s not something you can necessarily control. Other than creating excellent content, the only thing you can do is ask (which occasionally works).

Try to convince somebody to link to you on just writing great content. And, start guest posting on other blogs.Regardless of what you do, know that inbound links are essential to SEO.

11. Stop changing your domain name.

The age of your URL is a factor in your site’s search ranking, so be patient.

If you’re launching a new blog every six months, you’ll never see your site get the value it deserves.

12. Write like a human.

None of the above matters if you create content that sounds like a robot wrote it. Write great stuff, follow the steps above, have patience, and you’ll see results.

SEO Basics: The 6 Most Important Things Marketers Need to Know [Infographic]

Over the past few years, marketers have lived through everything from changes in search behavior (like the serious increase in mobile search queries) to search engine algorithm updates (like Google’s rewarding more secure websites). Nowadays, following and adapting to these changes has been a big key to a business’ success.

If you’re struggling to keep up with the changes in SEO and what you as a marketer need to do as a result, you’re in the right place. Check out the infographic below from Digital Marketing Philippines for a crash course in the most important parts of SEO marketers need to know to be successful in 2016 and beyond.

You’ll learn which ranking factors are the most and least important, how to optimize your website for mobile search, how to figure out what searchers are looking for, how to optimize for local search, the content length that’s best for search, the place website security has in good SEO, and more.

2 Basic Strategies for Social Media Marketing

There are two basic strategies for social media as a marketing tools:

  • PASSIVE APPROACH

Social media can be a useful source of market information and a way to hear customer perspectives. Blogs, content communities, and forums are platforms where individuals share their reviews and recommendations of brands, products, and services. Businesses are able to tap and analyze the customer voices and feedback generated in social media for marketing purposes; in this sense the social media is a relatively inexpensive source of market intelligence which can be used by marketers and managers to track and respond to consumer-identified problems and detect market opportunities. For example, the Internet erupted with videos and pictures of iPhone 6 “bend test” which showed that the coveted phone could be bent by hand pressure. The so-called “bend gate” controversy created confusion amongst customers who had waited months for the launch of the latest rendition of the iPhone.

  • ACTIVE APPROACH

Social media can be used not only as public relations and direct marketing tools but also as communication channels targeting very specific audiences with social media influencers and social media personalities and as effective customer engagement tools. Technologies predating social media, such as broadcast TV and newspapers can also provide advertisers with a fairly targeted audience, given that an ad placed during a sports game broadcast or in the sports section of a newspaper is likely to be read by sports fans. However, social media websites can target niche markets even more precisely. Using digital tools such as Google Adsense, advertisers can target their ads to very specific demographics, such as people who are interested in social entrepreneurship, political activism associated with a particular political party, or video gaming. Google Adsense does this by looking for keywords in social media user’s online posts and comments. It would be hard for a TV station or paper-based newspaper to provide ads that are this targeted (though not impossible, as can be seen with “special issue” sections on niche issues, which newspapers can use to sell targeted ads).

Social Media Marketing

Social media marketing is the use of social media platforms and websites to promote a product or service. Most of these social media platforms have their own built-in data analytics tools, which enable companies to track the progress, success, and engagement of ad campaigns. Companies address a range stakeholders through social media marketing including current and potential customers, current and potential employees, journalists, bloggers, and the general public. On a strategic level, social media marketing includes the management of the implementation of a marketing campaign, governance, setting the scope and the establishment of a firm’s desired social media “culture” and “tone”. To use social media effectively, firms should learn to allow customers and Internet users to post user-generated content, also known as “earned media”, rather than use marketer-prepared advertising copy. While social media marketing is often associated with companies, as of 2016, a range of not-for-profit organizations and government organizations are engaging in social media marketing of their programs or services.

Pay-per-Click

Pay-per-click (PPC), also known as cost per click (CPC), is an internet advertising model used to direct traffic to websites, in which an advertiser pays a publisher (typically a website owner or a network of websites) when the ad is clicked.

Pay-per-click is commonly associated with first-tier search engines (such as Google AdWords and Microsoft Bing Ads). With search engines, advertisers typically bid on keyword phrases relevant to their target market. In contrast, content sites commonly charge a fixed price per click rather than use a bidding system. PPC “display” advertisements, also known as “banner” ads, are shown on web sites with related content that have agreed to show ads and are typically not pay-per-click advertising. Social networks such as Facebook and Twitter have also adopted pay-per-click as one of their advertising models.

However, websites can offer PPC ads. Websites that utilize PPC ads will display an advertisement when a keyword query matches an advertiser’s keyword list, or when a content site displays relevant content. Such advertisements are called sponsored links or sponsored ads, and appear adjacent to, above, or beneath organic results on search engine results pages, or anywhere a web developer chooses on a content site.

The PPC advertising model is open to abuse through click fraud, although Google and others have implemented automated systems to guard against abusive clicks by competitors or corrupt web developers.

Digital Marketing

Digital marketing is an umbrella term for the marketing of products or services using digital technologies, mainly on the Internet, but also including mobile phones, display advertising, and any other digital medium.

The way in which digital marketing has developed since the 1990s and 2000s has changed the way brands and businesses utilize technology and digital marketing for their marketing. Digital marketing campaigns are becoming more prevalent as well as efficient, as digital platforms are increasingly incorporated into marketing plans and everyday life, and as people use digital devices instead of going to physical shops.

Digital marketing such as search engine optimization (SEO), search engine marketing (SEM), content marketing, influencer marketing, content automation, campaign marketing, and e-commerce marketing, social media marketing, social media optimization, e-mail direct marketing, display advertising, e–books, optical disks and games, are becoming more and more common in our advancing technology. In fact, this extends to non-Internet channels that provide digital media, such as mobile phones (SMS and MMS), callback and on-hold mobile ring tones.